Food Borne Illnesses Prevention

Food Cooking can prevent many food borne illnesses that would otherwise occur if the food is eaten raw. When heat is used in the preparation of food, it can kill or inactivate harmful organisms, such as bacteria and viruses, as well as various parasites such as tapeworms and Toxoplasma gondii.

 

Food poisoning and other illness from uncooked or poorly prepared food may be caused by bacteria such as pathogenic strains of Escherichia coliSalmonella typhimurium.

Bacteria Campylobacter, viruses such as noroviruses, and protozoa such as Entamoeba histolytica.

Bacteria, viruses and parasites may be introduced through salad, meat that is uncooked or done rare, and unboiled water.

Sterilizing

The sterilizing effect of cooking depends on temperature, cooking time, and technique used. Some food spoilage bacteria such as Clostridium botulinum.

Bacillus cereus can form spores that survive boiling, which then germinate and regrow after the food has cooled. This makes it unsafe to reheat cooked food more than once.

It increases the digestibility of many foods which are inedible or poisonous when raw. For example, raw cereal grains are hard to digest.

while kidney beans are toxic when raw or improperly cooked due to the presence of phytohaemagglutinin, which is inactivated by cooking for at least ten minutes at 100 °C (212 °F).

Food safety

it depends on the safe preparation, handling, and storage of food. Food spoilage bacteria proliferate in the “Danger zone” temperature range from 40 to 140 °F (4 to 60 °C), food therefore should not be stored in this temperature range.

Washing of hands and surfaces, especially when handling different meats, and keeping raw food separate from cooked food to avoid cross-contamination, are good practices in food preparation.

Foods prepared on plastic cutting boards may be less likely to harbor bacteria than wooden ones. Washing and disinfecting cutting boards, especially after use with raw meat, poultry, or seafood, reduces the risk of contamination.

Dairy Products Cooking

To Cook dairy products may reduce a protective effect against colon cancer. Researchers at the University of Toronto suggest that ingesting uncooked or unpasteurized dairy products may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.

Mice and rats fed uncooked sucrose, casein, and beef tallow had one-third to one-fifth the incidence of microeconomics as the mice and rats fed the same ingredients cooked.

This claim, however, is contentious. According to the Food and Drug Administration of the United States, health benefits claimed by raw milk advocates do not exist.

Home cooking has traditionally been a process carried out informally in a home or around a communal fire, and can be enjoyed by all members of the family, although in many cultures women bear primary responsibility.

Cooking is also often carried out outside of personal quarters, for example at restaurants, or schools.

Bakeries were one of the earliest forms of cooking outside the home, and bakeries in the past often offered the cooking of pots of food provided by their customers as an additional service.

In the present day, factory food preparation has become common, with many “ready-to-eat” foods being prepared and cooked in factories and home cooks using a mixture of scratch made, and factory made foods together to make a meal.

The nutritional value of including more commercially prepared foods has been found to be inferior to home-made foods.

Home-cooked

meals tend to be healthier with fewer calories, and less saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium on a per calorie basis while providing more fiber, calcium, and iron. The ingredients are also directly sourced, so there is control over authenticity, taste, and nutritional value.

The superior nutritional quality of home-cooking could therefore play a role in preventing chronic disease. Cohort studies following the elderly over 10 years show that adults who cook their own meals have significantly lower mortality, even when controlling for confounding variables.

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